Millionaire Chiefs but Indians on Reserves live in poverty

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Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Aboriginal people – Diverse groups living across the country
• New data from the National Household Survey (NHS) show that 1,400,685 people had an Aboriginal identity in 2011, representing 4.3% of the total Canadian population. Aboriginal people accounted for 3.8% of the population enumerated in the 2006 Census, 3.3% in the 2001 Census and 2.8% in the 1996 Census.
• The Aboriginal population increased by 232,385 people, or 20.1% between 2006 and 2011, compared with 5.2% for the non-Aboriginal population.
• The largest numbers of Aboriginal people lived in Ontario and the western provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia). Aboriginal people made up the largest shares of the population of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.
First Nations people
• In 2011, 851,560 people identified as a First Nations person, representing 60.8% of the total Aboriginal population and 2.6% of the total Canadian population.
• Many First Nations people lived in Ontario and the western provinces, but they made up the largest shares of the total population of the Northwest Territories, Yukon, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.
• In 2011, 637,660 First Nations people reported being Registered Indians, representing 74.9% of all First Nations people, 45.5% of the total Aboriginal population and 1.9% of the total Canadian population.
• One-quarter of First Nations people (213,900) were not Registered Indians, representing 15.3% of the total Aboriginal population and less than 1% of the total Canadian population.
Métis
• In 2011, 451,795 people identified as Métis. They represented 32.3% of the total Aboriginal population and 1.4% of the total Canadian people

http://www.med.uottawa.ca/sim/data/Aboriginal_Intro_e.htm
What the transparency act reveals about the pay of Aboriginal politicians

Chief Arthur Noskey earned a salary of $103,000 last year as the elected leader of the Loon River Cree, a northern Alberta First Nation with an on-reserve population of fewer than 500

Early attention was dominated by the revelation that Chief Ron Giesbrecht, of the the tiny Kwikwetlem First Nation in British Columbia’s lower mainland, took home an eye-popping $914,219 for the 12 months that ended last March 31. Incredulous news reports of Giesbrecht’s pay were followed by angry protests from some members of his First Nation, which has just 35 members living on its reserve

more at http://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/what-transparency-act-reveals-about-pay-of-aboriginal-politicians/

‘Collateral victim’ of residential schools gets 15 months for burning child 27 times with cigarette, lighter

A Quebec aboriginal man who repeatedly burned a five-year-old girl with a cigarette, leaving permanent scars on her face, arms, legs and genitalia, has been given a lenient sentence after a judge determined he is a “collateral victim” of residential school abuse.

Alain Bellemare, an Atikamekw from Wemotaci, Que., about 270 kilometres north of Montreal, was convicted of aggravated assault last June, and Crown prosecutor Éric Thériault sought a four-year prison term on the grounds that serious crimes against children have to be forcefully denounced. He noted that the 2011 assaults caused 27 third-degree burns — 25 from a cigarette and two from a lighter. The victim, who cannot be identified, was left to suffer without medical treatment.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/collateral-victim-of-residential-schools-gets-15-months-for-burning-child-27-times-with-cigarette-lighter
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News & Politics
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Brian Lovig, right wing news, gun laws, gun news, conservative news, 2nd amendment, conservative politics, right wing politics, global warming, social engineering, liberland, Donald trump, trump

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